Oh no, not another one!

OK, I know. I know. I just asked you to do a survey for me less than 10 days ago. The process was so flawed, however, that I have a new – even shorter one for you. This is just for the readers (you two know who you are) of the  blog. The last one involved people at several blogs and websites. We got lots of responses, but cannot separate them out as to which readers answered what. My fault. I haven’t written a real survey since my doctoral thesth-4is, and that was a long time ago.

So, here is the new one. This is EXCLUSIVE for you, my readers. I don’t want all the personal stuff about income, household members, what’s in your medicine cabinet, or whether you own any guns. Just the general stuff telling who you are and what you’d like to see at my blog. I honestly do want to give you content that will be helpful to you – or at least enjoyable.

So, here we go again. Here’s the link to the new and improved, world’s finest survey. Please fill it out soon.

THANK YOU for your kind indulgence.

 

I’m Available!

Friends and Neighbors,

Having returned from the mission field in Eastern Europe I am living in southern Maine again (York County, to be a bit more precise). I am currently available for pulpit supply and to speak at seminars and conferences.lovelace06

My experiences are broad and geographically wide. I was a pastor for thirty years. I have been a teacher of History and Political science in high school and junior high and I have been a mentor to seminary students. I have taught ethics and public speaking in a community college. I have lectured at conferences in Europe, Asia, Oceania, and Africa. I have also been a political journalist and recently published a book, with my wife, regarding Christian worship (Children in Church: Nurturing Hearts of Worship). I served in the US Navy.

My resumé is available here at this website. Simply go to the front page and click on Resumé.

I Believe

My wife and I have transitioned back to the USA, from our home in the Czech Republic. Although the ministry of Lifework Forum will continue, it will revert to an old form, based in the US, rather than in Central Europe. Part of this change entails me looking for employment. I am seeking ministry jobs, but not a pastoral position (leads would be appreciated).

As I fill out applications, I come across many which ask for my personal beliefs. With some, I have to answer a series of questions. Some are more free form. One of the brief statements I’ve been using is copied below. It’s not very comprehensive, but it get across the essential items, I think. feather20pen20clipart

I believe that God is the Infinite, Eternal Creator of all things and that He exists in the persons of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

I believe that as His disobedient creatures, both by nature and choice, all people are sinners and deserve the wrathful judgment of this Holy God.

I believe that God’s love and mercy are expressed in the substitutionary death of Jesus Christ, His only Son, who began His earthly existence through His birth to a Virgin and ended it through His bodily, visible ascension.

I believe that salvation from sin, paid for by the physical death of the One who alone was sinless, is offered as a gift and must be received by personal faith in the above truths and not by works of any sort.

I believe that the Bible is the inspired and infallible Word of God and that it is the operating manual for all of life.

 

 

Man’s Inhumanity to Men

So we are seeing some of the sights we have not visited while living here. Among these visits was one to a place called Terezin. This was a concentration camp during WWII. It is about a 45 minute ride from Prague. The camp was originally a fort to protect Czech lands from Prussian invasions.
gasoven
During WWII, the Nazis, created a concentration camp here and turned the entire town of Terezin into a Jewish ghetto. The camp was “technically” not an extermination camp. It was a collection point and transportation center for transport to such places as Auschwitz and Treblinka. Yet, more than 30,000 people died at Terezin. The causes of death included torture and battings by the guards, starvation, and epidemics.

 

There is more. Continue reading here.

Reading and Writing

Comma, Comma, Comma, Comma, Comma Chameleon. 

In a recent edition of Intelligent Life magazine, I read the following interesting introduction to the issue of punctuation. The entire article is well worth reading for punctuation geeks and writers of all definition.

feather20pen20clipartIn the beginning was the word, and each word was without spaces from one to the next. No wonder stone carvers didn’t write novels. A librarian in Alexandria in the third century BC is credited with being the first to use a system of high, intermediate and subordinate dots to instruct readers to pause and breathe – early punctuation was intended to help us with reading aloud; the silent reader came later. Much of it still does that job. Brackets are for a muttered aside; question marks denote inflection as much as interrogation. A few marks, the apostrophe and ampersand among them, stand in for something more long winded.

To read the entire article click here.

I wonder. What, dear readers and writers, is your favorite form of punctuation?

Reading and Writing

Heather Sheen writes:

cockade

During the American Revolution, General George Washington used cockades for a time as an

inexpensive way to denominate rank. On July 23, 1775 he stated:

As the Continental Army has unfortunately no uniforms, and consequently many inconveniences must arise from not being able to distinguish the commissioned officers from the privates, it is desired that some badge of distinction be immediately provided; for instance that the field officers may have red or pink colored cockades in their hats, the captains yellow or buff, and the subalterns green.

For more fascinating looks at history through decorative designs, click on over to Creative Cockades.

Reading and Writing

Not Interested in Heaven

Thomas Boston, in a book first published in 1720, wrote that “The unregenerate would find fault with heaven on several accounts.” His “accounts” 5 and 6 read this way:

5. They would never like the employment of heaven, they

feather20pen20clipart care so little for it now. The business of saints there would be an intolerable burden to them, seeing it is not agreeable to their nature. To be taken up in beholding, admiring, and praising Him that sits on the throne, and the Lamb, would be work unsuitable, and therefore unsavory to the unredeemed soul.

6. They would find this fault with it, that the whole is of everlasting continuance. This would be a killing burden in it to them. How as now account the Sabbath day a burden, brook the celebration of an everlasting Sabbath in the heavens!

(Human Nature  in Its Fourfold State, p. 247-8.)

What do you think? Would heaven bore you? Overburden you? What is your concept of heaven?

Reading and Writing

feather20pen20clipartFrom Bethany Kaczmarek:

I write because I cannot be silent.

And frankly, my voice doesn’t carry far enough.

We mustn’t forget that words have the power to lift our eyes heavenward. To lead our hearts Godward. To move our beautiful feet toward the masses. To trust in One Who will fight for us.

But we’ve all been wounded by thoughtless, heartless, self-serving words before. Words have the ability to knock the wind out of our sails. To burden our backs. To bruise our spirits. To make us want to fight.

I want the words I pen–speak–sing–whisper–shout to be used for good. For God’s glory.

Read more here.